Archive for the News Category

How Did This California Girl Become a Real Warrior Princess?

Posted in News with tags on September 22, 2013 by 2eyeswatching

Donate Button 1

Donate Button 2

Post 2433

How Did This California Girl Become a Real Warrior Princess?

By  | Secrets to Your Success – 11 hours ago

http://shine.yahoo.com/secrets-to-your-success/how-did-this-california-girl-become-a-real-warrior-princess–183524755.html

California entrepreneurMindy Budgor was just 27 when she sold off a successful business she had created, netting enough to drive a BMW and shop at Gucci and Prada. Still, she felt hollow and like a failure, and was desperate to find more meaning in life.

More on Shine: Father and Daughter’s Amazing Appalachian Trek to Save Lives

Budgor found it in the unlikeliest of places: the Kenyan wilderness, where she slept on the ground with members of the Maasai tribe, shedding enough of her formerly privileged existence to become the tribe’s first female warrior.

“If you’d told me a year earlier that I’d be deep in the bush, hair knotted from days in the forest, running in the direction of a 1,300-pound [buffalo] that could make short work of me, I’d have told you to get your head examined,” she told Glamour in an October-issue story about her new memoir, “Warrior Princess.” “Yet there I was. And I’d never been more sure I was in the right place.”

 

So how did a nice Jewish girl from Santa Barbara—one who loved manis and pedis and warm croissants, and whose biggest travel adventure up to that point had been a cruise to Alaska, according to the Guardian—wind up in such a place?

It all started with Budgor’s decision to take a friend’s advice: She would shake up her comfortable life and embark upon a tough humanitarian mission to Kenya, where she’d assist in building a health clinic in a Kenyan game reserve.

During her two weeks there, she learned much about the seminomadic Maasai tribe through conversations with Winston, a local chief who spoke fluent English. He told her about the tribe’s brave warriors—how they ate raw meat, fended off lions and buffaloes, protected their community with spears and swords, and were basically fearless.

Budgor asked if women could be warriors and was told, unequivocally, no, because “women aren’t strong enough or brave enough to do it.”

That answer, as Budgor explained in her Guardian essay, made her furious. “I can take no for an answer if there’s a good reason, but the idea that women couldn’t be warriors just because they weren’t men wasn’t sitting well with me,” she wrote. “Winston and I made a deal that if I left my stilettos behind, he would take me through the traditional rites of passage to become a warrior.”

Budgor’s book, out now.

She flew back to California to prepare for her incredible opportunity — one that a Maasai woman implored upon her not to squander. It was then, Budgor explains, that she realized the challenge went beyond the personal.

“Maasai women are extraordinarily strong: they build homes, chop trees for firewood, walk seven hours a day to fetch water,” she explained in the Guardian. “But they are not treated as equals. I knew that the warriors had the utmost respect in the tribe and that they were given greater access to education and not married off when they were 12. I believed that providing women with the right to become warriors would broaden the tribe’s perspective of their personal power, which could only help them fight to maintain their customs.”

After working with a personal trainer for six weeks in California to get in shape for her upcoming challenge, Budgor, along with a similarly adventurous friend, returned to Winston. He reneged on his offer, but the determined women found their way to a more open-minded warrior named Lanet, in Nairobi, who agreed to take them on.

They headed into the African bush with essentials: tartan sheets for clothing, metal tips for spears and, for Budgor, a bottle of Chanel Dragon red nail polish (“It just made me feel fierce,” she explained) and a pair of pearl earrings to remind her of home.

Lanet and six other warriors then led them through a month of surreal tasks that were both physically and mentally challenging: sleeping on the ground in a communal bed of leaves and branches, going days without food, getting bloody blisters on her hands as she practiced spear-hunting skills, and, incredibly, suffocating a goat to death and drinking its warm blood (which Budgor vomited up immediately).

“The entire time I never put a brush through my hair. I’d wash myself with the same water cows and buffalo used, yet I felt beautiful,” she told Glamour. “I felt strong. I felt proud.”

In a final test of bravery, Budgor speared a massive buffalo, inspiring cheers from her warrior trainers. She had passed, and was deemed a warrior, and succeeded in changing the Maasai gender policy; this year, 12 girls in the village she had been in will go through the warrior training.

Back in the U.S., Budgor went back to her life of luxury, but was forever changed. “I wasn’t the same girl who’d gone into the bush,” she said.

She went on to graduate from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, currently lives in New York, and has not stopped pushing herself. In August, Budgor ran a half marathon in Canada, posting these words of wisdom on her Facebook page in the days leading up to the race: “Warrior tip: Keep going.”

There Is a Man Wandering Around California With 3 Mules

Posted in News with tags on September 22, 2013 by 2eyeswatching

Donate Button 1

Donate Button 2

Post 2432

There Is a Man Wandering Around California With 3 Mules

The AtlanticBy Mark Lukach | The Atlantic – 18 hours ago

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/man-wandering-around-california-3-113000929.html

 

There is a man wandering around California with three mules.

He has a name, but he prefers to go by Mule. Police departments throughout the state know his name. They inevitably get calls from residents who wonder why a man with three mules is sleeping on the side of the road, and from time to time they have to go and investigate and decide whether or not to ticket him. He has had so many run-ins with the police that he has a lawyer. (The lawyer knows Mule’s name.) The filmmaker John McDonald, who has spent hundreds of hours filming Mule on his journeys, and who helped Mule set up a Facebook page, knows Mule’s name as well.

But Mule introduced himself to me as Mule, and so that’s what I’m going to call him.

Mule is 65 years old and has slept outside with his three mules for the last 10 years, though he’s lived his nomadic lifestyle for much longer than that – 29 years on and off. Early on, he split his time between summer wandering, and then enduring what he calls “shit jobs” during the winter to earn enough to live off for the next summer.

He got his first mule in Spokane, Washington, so that he could carry more supplies with him into the bush than his meager, rail-thin frame can handle; McDonald says of Mule, ”He has the build of Ghandi, but he sure doesn’t have the personality of Ghandi.” With his first mule, and then a second, and a third, he could load up on supplies to last him for much longer in the undeveloped parts of the American West, so he’d only have to resurface in towns to resupply once every month or so before once again disappearing.

But the world he inhabited was changing. While he sought solitude, he kept bumping into development. Land he had passed through was no longer public, and was vanishing behind fences. Everywhere he looked, he saw ever more roads and cars.

Two years ago, he walked the 295 mile stretch of land between Las Vegas and Ely, Nevada, land that was supposed to stay undeveloped by the Bureau of Land Management, land that had been used by Shoshone Indians for hundreds of years. In that BLM land, he encountered powerlines, the earliest stages of development. He knew then that he wanted to speak up about what he was seeing. Most immediately, suburban sprawl was threatening his way of life, but as Mule sees it, it threatens the way we all are meant to live. On the road to Ely, he gave up on wandering in the wild by himself. He got to Ely, and turned west, so that he could talk to people about the disappearance of public space.

Which is why there is a man wandering through California with three mules.

He has walked the boardwalk in Venice Beach with his mules. They once slept under a BART station in Oakland. They walk at day, and stop at night to rest in public spaces, which are mostly parks and neglected patches of grass along the sides of roads. His mules graze and drink the water they come across along the way. “We claim our right to use public space in a way that is applicable to us,” Mule told me.

But this does not always go well for Mule. As he walked through Sacramento, a police officer told him, “This is not okay. Maybe in the gold rush days. But now we have cars.” Police stop him constantly, which is a nuisance for Mule. He’s not doing anything wrong, at least as he sees it. “We don’t attempt to stay anywhere for more than a few days to rest. We don’t set up camp structures or anything permanent. We don’t collect garbage. We’re not homeless. Our home is the Earth.”

The police mostly let him stay for the night, since he’s only passing through. It’s rare to find places where mules are explicitly prohibited by law, so they often don’t have much to go on besides complaints from the community. Sometimes the police scare him off from where he intended to sleep for the night. Sometimes they ticket him, but they almost always drop the charges. But not always. He is currently facing a $485 charge for sleeping outside the entrance to the Torrey Pines State Reserve. He’s fighting the ticket, which is why he has a lawyer, Sharon Sherman, who has taken on the case pro bono. The first thing she had to do was push the date of the trial back from August 2013 to January 2014, because Mule follows the sun and the seasons, and escapes the summer heat in the north, and was far from San Diego at the time of the original trial date.

Recently, he had a rather nasty, run-in with the police in Gilroy, south of San Jose. He was arrested on August 30 while walking along the side of 101. The police wanted Mule to leave the road, but he insisted that there were no signs prohibiting him from being there. They arrested him for failing to follow the orders of a police officer, and Mule was taken to jail, and then transferred to a psychiatric facility, where he stayed locked up for six days. The animals were sent to a nearby animal shelter. Mule was released through the aid of a patients-rights advocate, who told a friend of Mule that it was the most bogus case she had ever seen. Mule will be going to court on September 12 to defend his plea of not guilty so that he can get back to wandering.

The filmmaker John McDonald met Mule the same way that I did — a happenstance bumping into him, and McDonald couldn’t contain his curiosity. After a few interactions, Mule agreed to let McDonald make a documentary about him, and to follow him around and collect footage.

While McDonald was at first interested in Mule as a documentary subject, after a few months of filming, he confessed to Mule, “I really believe a lot in what you’re doing. In spite of the documentary, I would probably want to support you and what you’re doing, and I respect you.”

Everyone has their own attraction to Mule. While I was interviewing him, roughly a dozen people stopped to say hi, wish him luck, or even give him gifts, like a man who gave Mule a length of high-quality nylon rope. “A cowboy can always use some rope,” the stranger said with a smile, and walked off. Mule is very popular amongst equestrians — while researching this article, I found out that a writer with Mules and More Magazine is also writing about Mule. He has support from advocates of multi-use trails that connect communities, trails like the Iron Horse Trail in Contra Costa County in San Francisco’s East Bay, a trail that allows people to safely get from town to town without using cars.

Mule’s lawyer, Sharon Sherman, took on his case because she is fascinated by the legal questions that Mule’s way of life raise. “There is always a balance between people’s freedoms, and the needs of a community,” she explained to me. “To me, this is another example of that. I’ve been in practice for 35 years, but Mule really made me stop and think about issues that I’ve never considered before. We have a countervailing balance between public space, private space, and what access do we really have to public space. Sure, I can walk down a street, but which street? What’s the difference in using a road in a car, than with mules? Why do you have more rights in a car, than if you are walking, and walking with animals?”

But what struck me most when I came across Mule along the Canal Trail, an offshoot of the Iron Horse Trail, wasn’t just the mules, or his simple, nomadic way of life. It was the large white lettering that was stenciled to the side of his packs, lettering that wrote out 3MULES.COM.

There is a man wandering through California with three mules, and a website.

When Mule first turned west from Ely, Nevada, he had his heart set on starting a website. “I needed a website so that when I got to California, I would have a voice,” Mule explained to me. “I don’t have the brain to deal with this technological stuff, but I knew that the website would be a voice. I’m nothing. I’m uneducated, I’m a weak little man, I’m the low man on the totem pole and I’ve been there my whole life. But a website would be my voice.”

When John McDonald first met Mule over a year ago, Mule was carrying with him three cell phones, two voice recorders, a digital camera, and a Samsung tablet. He already had his website,3mules.com, up and running — set up as an act of kindness by a person he met on his way to California. But the website had very little information, and Mule didn’t know how to update it. When Mule agreed to let McDonald film him, he asked for a favor in return: McDonald had to teach Mule how to use the tools that he carried with him.

Every time they meet, Mule takes scrupulous notes in a notebook on topics like how to post photos to Facebook, or edit captions, or leave comments. It’s a slow process. As McDonald put it, “it takes a tremendous amount of patience to work with Mule, and he is slow to build trust. He has given me his passwords, but then he gets paranoid and changes his passwords, and then he’ll call me and give me the new ones.” The first time they met, McDonald taught Mule how to send text messages, so Mule didn’t have to pay roaming charges for the extremely limited plan he had for his cell phone.

As of this writing, Mule has 2,802 likes on his Facebook page. McDonald encouraged him to set up the Facebook page as a tool to better reach an audience with his message, and it took a lot of convincing. Mule didn’t like the ads on the site, because he doesn’t want his message to be tainted by commercial interests. But Mule is now hooked on it. He told me about his Facebook page three separate times over the course of our interview, and McDonald says that when they meet, the first thing Mule wants to do is talk about how the Facebook page is doing, and study the analytics.

There is something deeply beautiful about how Mule is living. Just read through his Facebook page to see how much people admire his deliberate wanderings and his simple, poetic insights. Many of the things he says about development, the “Megatropolis,” and balance sound almost prophetic. It’s especially captivating to hear him talk about his way of life as a place in and of itself. “These mules and the way that we are living is a place. It’s got its own magic, there’s no doubt about it. We are protected and guided. I’m out there on the side of the road, with cars coming at us, and there is something protecting and guiding us. This place has got its rules. You only take what you need, and you give your hope and your faith to this place. It’s a great place to be.”

But there is also something deeply ironic about Mule’s use of technology. He travels in a way that feels biblical, except that he’s carrying a GPS tracker, cell phones, and a tablet. He goes to Starbucks to charge his devices and use their free WiFi, and it’s hard to think of a more obvious symbol of suburban sprawl than Starbucks. In fact, the first time Mule and McDonald entered a Starbucks together to work on the website, Mule insisted that McDonald didn’t film him inside, fearing it would look bad.

There are those who will say that you can’t preach against the excesses of development while at the same time using the products of development. They will say that he’s just freeloading off the work of others, and that his message is hollowed out by posting it on Facebook.

But I see it differently. Not everyone will be so lucky as to stumble into Mule like I did, to share a brief but powerful encounter with a man who is living his life in a way that makes you ask yourself big questions about public and private space, freedom, and balance. But they can easily stumble onto his website and his Facebook page through the power of Shares and Likes to sample his message.

While he was detained in the psychiatric facility, he handwrote a description of his arrest. When McDonald visited him, Mule gave the note to McDonald to photograph and post on Facebook, so that he could share what he had happened. The note, which is full of grammar mistakes, concludes: “We had the right to be on US101 therefore the order was unlawful we had the duty of a citizen in a free country to disobey an unlawful order and suffer the consequences JAIL.” Without making too grandiose of a comparison, it kind of makes you wonder if Thoreau would have posted portions of “Civil Disobedience” on Facebook, too.

Mule grew up in suburbia, just south of San Francisco, and spent his childhood exploring the orchard fields of Los Altos, orchard fields that were long ago replaced with homes and offices for technology giants. He’s 65 years old. He’s been wandering with his mules for 29 years, and doesn’t like what he has seen change in that time. He will eventually make his way down to San Diego in January for his court date, but he’s in no rush. He’ll make new friends along the way, and will probably butt heads with police along the way, too. As Mule likes to put it, “We live everywhere and aren’t going anywhere.”

There’s a man wandering California with three mules, and a website, collecting Likes along the way.

One billion slum dwellers

Posted in News with tags on September 17, 2013 by 2eyeswatching

Donate Button 1

Donate Button 2

As A Reminder How Suffer They Are

Post 2403

February 24, 2012

One billion slum dwellers

http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2012/02/slum_life.html

One billion people worldwide live in slums, a number that will likely double by 2030. The characteristics of slum life vary greatly between geographic regions, but they are generally inhabited by the very poor or socially disadvantaged. Slum buildings can be simple shacks or permanent and well-maintained structures but lack clean water, electricity, sanitation and other basic services. In this post, I’ve included images from several slums including Kibera slum in Nairobi, Kenya, the second largest slum in Africa (and the third largest in the world); New Building slum in central Malabo, Equatorial Guinea; Pinheirinho slum – where residents recently resisted police efforts to forcibly evict them; and slum dwellers from Kolkata, Mumbai and New Delhi, India. India has about 93 million slum dwellers and as much as 50% of New Delhi’s population is thought to live in slums, 60% of Mumbai. – Paula Nelson (55 photos total)
 

Cambodian lawmaker Mu Sochuo, from the opposition Sam Rainsy party, pleads with riot policemen to stop a forced eviction of villagers at a slum village in the centre of Phnom Penh, Jan. 4, 2012. Cambodian lawmakers from the opposition Sam Rainsy party visited the village after authorities forcefully evicted villagers from the Borei Keila community in the capital. (Tang Chhin Sothy/AFP/Getty Images) 

 

A Cambodian policeman stands guard as children carry corrugated iron during the eviction of residents in a slum village in the centre of Phnom Penh, Jan. 4, 2012. (Tang Chhin Sothy/AFP/Getty Images) #

 

A Cambodian woman sits near her baby as residents are evicted from a slum village in the centre of Phnom Penh, Jan. 4, 2012. (Tang Chhin Sothy/AFP/Getty Images) #

 

A Cambodian woman salvages some belongings after the forced eviction of residents from a slum village, Jan. 4, 2012. (Tang Chhin Sothy/AFP/Getty Images) #

 

Children stand in the schoolyard of the Academy for Peace and Justice while waiting to sing the national anthem in Port-au-Prince, Jan. 9, 2012. Bankrolled by a roster of Hollywood celebrities, the Academy of Peace and Justice is Haiti’s first free secondary school and draws hundreds of children from Port-au-Prince’s biggest slums. Its success stands out in Haiti, which is still struggling to lift itself from the rubble left by an earthquake two years ago that killed roughly 300,000 people and left more than 1.5 million homeless. (Swoan Parker/Reuters) #

 

Students dust off their shoes before arriving at the Academy for Peace and Justice in Port-au-Prince Jan. 9, 2012. The Academy of Peace and Justice is Haiti’s first free secondary school and draws hundreds of children from Port-au-Prince’s biggest slums. (Swoan Parker/Reuters) #

 

Students of the Academy for Peace and Justice attend class in Port-au-Prince Jan. 9, 2012. (Swoan Parker/Reuters) #

 

A student attends lessons at the Academy for Peace and Justice, Haiti’s first free secondary school, in Port-au-Prince Jan. 9, 2012. (Swoan Parker/Reuters) #

 

Afghan refugee Nazeeha Taj, 5, plays with a drum in a slum on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan, Jan. 11, 2012. (Muhammed Muheisen/Associated Press) #

 

Afghan refugee children stand at the main gate of their muddy house at a slum on the outskirts of Islamabad, Jan. 4, 2012. (Anjum Naveed/Associated Press) #

 

Pakistani boys compete in a wheelbarrow race at a slum on the outskirts of Islamabad, Jan. 3, 2012. (Anjum Naveed/Associated Press) #

 

An Afghan refugee girl walks with her sister in a slum on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan, Jan. 13, 2012. (Muhammed Muheisen/Associated Press) #

 

Two Afghan refugee girls and a boy make their way through a muddy alley, following a rainy night, in a slum on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan, Jan. 16, 2012. The Pakistani government and the United Nations refugee agency reached an agreement in March 2009, to allow some 1.7 million registered Afghan refugees living in Pakistan to continue sheltering there until at least 2012, thousands of them still live without electricity, running water and other basic services. (Muhammed Muheisen/Associated Press) #

 

An Afghan refugee girl stands in a muddy alley, following a rainy night, Jan. 16, 2012. (Muhammed Muheisen/Associated Press) #

 

A Pakistani family gathers round a fire inside a shanty, to warm themselves during a cold evening, in a slum in Islamabad, Pakistan, Jan. 13, 2012. (Muhammed Muheisen/Associated Press) #

 

Pakistani children warm themselves during a cold evening, Jan. 13, 2012. (Muhammed Muheisen/Associated Press) #

 

Afghan refugee girl, Hira Farouq, 4, eats a lollipop while playing with other children, Jan. 16, 2012. (Muhammed Muheisen/Associated Press) #

 

A Pakistani woman washes clothes outside her house in the slum area of Lahore, Jan. 8, 2012. The IMF forecasts Pakistan to post growth of just 2.6 percent in 2011, among the lowest in Asia, while inflation is tipped to stand at around 14 percent this year and next — among the highest in the world. (Arif Ali/AFP/Getty Images) #

 

An Afghan refugee boy, Hikmat Agha, 4, waits to start his daily class, to learn how to recite verses from the Quran, in a mosque in a slum on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan, Jan. 18, 2012. (Muhammed Muheisen/Associated Press) #

 

Afghan refugee girls attend a daily class to learn how to recite verses from the Quran, in a mosque in a slum on the outskirts of Islamabad, Jan. 18, 2012. (Muhammed Muheisen/Associated Press) #

 

A woman slum dweller sits at the site of a fire in Kolkata, India, Jan. 23, 2012. Over a thousand people were left homeless after at least 100 shanties were gutted in a major fire. (Bikas Das/Associated Press) #

 

Slum dwellers search for their belongings through the debris after a fire in Kolkata, India, Jan. 23, 2012. (Bikas Das/Associated Press) #

 

A woman begs in a subway in Mumbai, India, Jan. 11, 2011. Villagers flock to cities to find work causing slums to expand and people to live on the streets. India has about 93 million slum dwellers, and as much as 50 percent of New Delhi’s population is thought to live in slums, and 60 percent of Mumbai’s population. (Rafiq Maqbool/ Associated Press) #

 

A dog lies beside pavement dwellers sleeping on a road in Mumbai, India, Jan. 11, 2011. Sixty percent of the residents of Mumbai live in slums. (Rafiq Maqbool/Associated Press) #

 

Street children eat a meal on a roadside in Mumbai, India, Jan. 11, 2011. (Rafiq Maqbool/Associated Press) #

 

An Indian woman sleeps outdoors in a shanty area in Hyderabad, India, Jan. 11, 2012. India has about 93 million slum dwellers. (Mahesh Kumar A./Associated Press) #

 

An Indian bride, who is a pavement dweller, waits for her wedding ceremony, which will be performed on a street in Mumbai, Jan. 11, 2012. (Rafiq Maqbool/Associated Press) #

 

A mobile unit arrives at a slum during an anti-polio drive in New Delhi, Jan. 15, 2012. India marked a full year since its last reported case of polio. The milestone is seen as a major victory in the global effort to eradicate the crippling disease. (Saurabh Das/Associated Press) #

 

A child is administered polio drops at a slum by a mobile unit during an anti-polio drive in New Delhi, Jan. 15, 2012. (Saurabh Das/Associated Press) #

 

Mohammed Shamim Sheikh, who suffers from multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis, listens to a social worker at his home in a slum on the outskirts of Mumbai, Jan. 16, 2012. Indian doctors have reported the country’s first cases of “totally drug-resistant tuberculosis,” a long-feared and virtually untreatable form of the killer lung disease. (Rafiq Maqbool/Associated Press) #

 

Workers erect an awning made of Indian tricolor to hide a slum near the venue of an election rally where an address was to be given by congress party president Sonia Gandhi in Kapurthala, India, Jan. 19, 2012. (Altaf Qadri/Associated Press) #

 

A man takes a bath outside his shanty in front of the Indian national flag in Dharavi, one of Asia’s largest slums, in Mumbai, Jan. 24, 2012. Female workers at Dharavi made a 151ft-long (46m) Indian flag to celebrate India’s Republic day. (Danish Siddiqui/Reuters) #

 

Indian men walk past a 151 feet long handmade Indian national flag hung on a wall of the Dharavi slum, Jan. 24, 2012. The flag was prepared to celebrate women’s empowerment by seventeen members of a non-governmental organization ahead of the Republic Day. India celebrates its Republic Day on Jan. 26. (Rafiq Maqbool/Associated Press) #

 

An elevated view of the Indian national flag on a wall of the Dharavi slum, Jan. 24, 2012. (Rafiq Maqbool/Associated Press) #

 

Residents of the Pinheirinho slum stand ready to defend their neighborhood from police they expect to arrive with a court order to evict them from their homes, in Sao Jose dos Campos, 50 miles (80 kms) northeast of Sao Paulo, Jan. 13, 2012. Some 1,500 families who have been occupying a private plot of land for the past eight years expect to be evicted as the real owner’s request for eviction reaches a final decision in a local court. (Marcelo Alves/Reuters) #

 

Residents of the Pinheirinho slum stand ready with a muzzled dog to defend their neighborhood from police in Sao Jose dos Campos, Jan. 13, 2012. (Marcelo Alves/Reuters) #

 

Police walk past a barrier set on fire by residents of the Pinheirinho slum, who are resisting police arrival to evict them by court order. (Roosevelt Cassio/Reuters)#

 

A woman is directed to avoid an area where police are confronting residents of the Pinheirinho slum, who are resisting police arrival to evict them, Jan. 22, 2012. (Roosevelt Cassio/Reuters) #

 

A resident of the Pinheirinho slum listens as he learns that a federal court injunction temporarily suspended an eviction of the area they have been occupying. (Roosevelt Cassio/Reuters) #

 

Residents of the Pinheirinho slum celebrate beside their homes, after hearing a federal court injunction that temporarily suspended an eviction of the area. (Roosevelt Cassio/Reuters) #

 

A man runs through the street in front of Pinheirinho slum where residents try to fight eviction attempts by police. (Roosevelt Cassio/Reuters) #

 

Police stand guard on empty streets a day after they forcibly evicted residents of the Pinheirinho slum under court order. (Roosevelt Cassio/Reuters) #

 

Police disperse demonstrators protesting the eviction of residents from Pinheirinho slum in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Jan. 25, 2012. Amnesty International is calling on Brazil’s government to help more than 5,000 people left homeless when police violently evicted them from a sprawling slum. (Nelson Antoine/Associated Press)#

 

Residents of the Pinheirinho slum use a church as a temporary shelter the day after they were evicted from their homes by police acting under court order. (Roosevelt Cassio/Reuters) #

 

People follow court proceedings on a television set broadcasting live from the International Criminal Court in The Hague, Netherlands in a shop in the Kibera Slums in Nairobi, Kenya, Jan. 23, 2012. International Criminal Court judges on Monday ordered four prominent Kenyans, including two potential presidential candidates, to stand trial for allegedly orchestrating a deadly wave of violence after their country’s disputed 2007 presidential election. (Khalil Senosi/Associated Press) #

 

A woman walks past a grain shop at a market in the Kibera slum of the Kenyan capital Nairobi, Jan. 20, 2012. Kibera is a vast shanty town that lacks even basic services such as sanitation. Many Kibera residents – there are hundreds of thousands of them – are angry that while prices of food have risen, wages have not. Many say their families now have to forego meals. A few Kibera residents make their way to supermarkets in a nearby mall to buy tiny portions of food. But they are well out of reach for most. (Noor Khamis/Reuters) #

 

A woman prepares grains at her shop in the Kibera slum in the Kenyan capital of Nairobi Jan. 20, 2012. (Noor Khamis/Reuters) #

 

Water from a leaky fire hose rains down on neighborhood residents as they attempt to put out a fire that had already burned dozens of homes, in the New Building slum neighborhood in central Malabo, Equatorial Guinea, Monday, Jan. 23, 2012. As firefighters struggled to get enough water pressure to make their firehoses work, residents fought the fire with buckets of waste water and used mallets to tear down homes in the fire’s path. Equatorial Guinea and Gabon are currently co-hosting the African Cup of Nations soccer tournament. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell) #

 

Local residents throw buckets of water on a burning house as a fire destroyed dozens of homes, in the New Building slum neighborhood in central Malabo, Equatorial Guinea, Jan. 23, 2012. Firefighters on the scene struggled to make their firefighting equipment work and were only sporadically able to spray the fire with water. Equatorial Guinea and Gabon are currently co-hosting the African Cup of Nations soccer tournament. (Rebecca Blackwell/Associated Press) #

 

A local resident walks amidst the ruins of dozens of houses after a fire ravaged part of the New Building slum neighborhood, Jan. 23, 2012. As firefighters struggled to get enough water pressure to make their fire hoses work, residents fought the fire with buckets of waste water and used mallets to tear down homes in the fire’s path. (Rebecca Blackwell/Associated Press) #

 

Sisters Benedicta Macole and Susana Ritope Macole, survey twisted scraps of metal roofing, all that remains of the house where they grew up, after a fire ravaged part the New Building slum neighborhood, Jan. 24, 2012. Residents say scores of homes in the tightly-packed neighborhood were destroyed, leaving several hundred people displaced. (Rebecca Blackwell/Associated Press) #

 

As people stand on a wall to watch a fire burn through dozens of homes, residents carry rescued furniture out of the New Building slum neighborhood, Jan. 23, 2012. (Rebecca Blackwell/Associated Press) #

 

Local residents crowd around a fire truck in the main street of the New Building slum neighborhood, where a fire ravaged dozens of homes, Jan. 23, 2012. (Rebecca Blackwell/Associated Press) #

 

Local residents stand with rescued belongings as they watch a fire ravage homes in the New Building slum neighborhood, Jan. 23, 2012. (Rebecca Blackwell/Associated Press) #

 

People left homeless by a fire that ravaged the New Building slum a day earlier sit with their rescued belongings at the edge of the neighborhood, Jan. 24, 2012. Behind them, an apartment building completed several years earlier, sits unoccupied. (Rebecca Blackwell/Associated Press) #

Bloodshed in Egypt

Posted in News with tags on August 22, 2013 by 2eyeswatching

Donate Button 1

Donate Button 2

Post 2383

Bloodshed in Egypt

http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2013/08/bloodshed_in_egypt.html

Hundreds were killed across Egypt today as security forces stormed the two protest camps in Cairo filled with supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi. Violence erupted in streets throughout the capital city and the country. A one month state of emergency across the country was declared and the interim vice president resigned. ( 27 photos total)

 

An Egyptian woman tries to stop a military bulldozer from hurting a wounded youth during clashes that broke out as Egyptian security forces moved in to disperse supporters of Egypt’s deposed president Mohamed Morsi in a huge protest camp near Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque in eastern Cairo on August 14. (Mohammed Abdel Moneim/AFP/Getty Images) 

 

Supporters of Egypt’s ousted President Mohammed Morsi chant slogans against Egyptian Defense Minister Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi during clashes with Egyptian security forces in Cairo’s Mohandessin neighborhood, Egypt, Aug. 14. Egyptian security forces, backed by armored cars and bulldozers, moved on Wednesday to clear two sit-in camps by supporters of the country’s ousted President Mohammed Morsi, showering protesters with tear gas as the sound of gunfire rang out at both sites.((Hassan Ammar/Associated Press)#

 

An Egyptian security forces bulldozer moves in to disperse a protest camp held by supporters of ousted president Mohamed Morsi and members of the Muslim Brotherhood, on August 14 near Cairo’s Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque.(AFP/Getty Images) #

 

An injured Egyptian youth is seen at a makeshift hospital during clashes between supporters of Egypt’s ousted president Mohamed Morsi and police in Cairo on August 14 as security forces backed by bulldozers moved in on two huge pro-Morsi protest camps, launching a long-threatened crackdown that left dozens dead. The clearance operation began shortly after dawn when security forces surrounded the sprawling Rabaa al-Adawiya camp in east Cairo and a similar one at Al-Nahda square, in the centre of the capital. (Mosaab El-Shamy/AFP/Getty Images) #

 

Egyptian protesters throw rocks at security forces during the clearing of one of the two sit-ins of ousted president Morsi supporters, near Rabaa Adawiya mosque, Cairo, Egypt, August 14. (Mosaab Elshamy/European Pressphoto Agency) #

 

A member of the Egyptian security forces holds up a copy of the Quran they clear the smaller of the two sit-ins by supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi, near the Cairo University campus in Giza, Cairo, Egypt, Aug. 14.(Imad Abdul Rahman/Associated Press) #

 

An Egyptian protester climbs on a bulldozer taking part in the clearing of one of the two sit-in sites of supporters of ousted president Morsi supporters, in Nahda square, near the Cairo University, in Cairo, Egypt, August 14.(Mahmoud Ghany/European Pressphoto Agency) #

 

Two boys hold on to a supporter of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi as Egyptian security forces clear a sit-in camp set up near Cairo University in Cairo’s Giza district, Egypt, Aug. 14. (Hussein Tallal/Associated Press) #

 

Supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi take cover from Egyptian security forces fire during clashes in Rabaah Al-Adawiya in Cairo’s Nasr City district, Egypt, Aug. 14. Egyptian police in riot gear swept in with armored vehicles and bulldozers Wednesday to clear two sprawling encampments of supporters of the country’s ousted Islamist president in Cairo, showering protesters with tear gas as the sound of gunfire rang out.(Manu Brabo/Associated Press) #

 

A supporter of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi sits next to a woman lying down on the floor amid smoke as Egyptian security forces clear their sit-in camp set up near Cairo University in Cairo’s Giza district, Egypt, Aug. 14. (Hussein Tallal/Associated Press) #

 

An Egyptian security force kicks a supporter of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi as they clear a sit-in camp set up near Cairo University in Cairo’s Giza district, Egypt, Aug. 14. (Hussein Tallal/Associated Press) #

 

A protester comforts a wounded colleague after Egyptian security forces began to clear a sit-in by supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi in the eastern Nasr City district of Cairo, Egypt, Aug. 14.(Ahmed Gomaa/Associated Press) #

 

Egyptian security forces detain supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi as they clear a sit-in camp set up near Cairo University in Cairo’s Giza district, Egypt, Aug. 14.(Mohammed Asad/Associated Press) #

 

A young man mourns next to the bodies of protesters killed during the clearing of one of the two sit-ins of ousted president Morsi supporters, at the field hospital, near Rabaa Adawiya mosque, Cairo, Egypt, August 14.(Mosaab Elshamy/European Pressphoto Agency) #

 

Egyptian supporters of ousted President Morsi push over a truck during protests in Giza, near Cairo, Egypt, August 14. (Khaled Elfiqi/European Pressphoto Agency) #

 

A supporter of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi reacts during clashes with Egyptian security forces in Rabaah Al-Adawiya in Cairo’s Nasr City district, Egypt, Aug. 14. (Manu Brabo/Associated Press) #

 

Egyptian security forces takes a break as they clear a sit-in camp set up by supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi near Cairo University in Cairo’s Giza district, Egypt, Aug. 14.(Hussein Tallal/Associated Press) #

 

Members of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi flee from tear gas and rubber bullets fired by riot police during clashes, on a bridge leading to Rabba el Adwia Square where they are camping, in Cairo August 14. (Amr Abdallah Dalsh/Reuters) #

 

Two protesters and a child leave one of the two sit-in sites of supporters of ousted president Morsi supporters, in Nahda square, near the Cairo University, in Cairo, Egypt, August 14.(Mahmoud Ghany/European Pressphoto Agency) #

 

A police vehicle is pushed off of the 6th of October bridge by protesters close to the largest sit-in by supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi in the eastern Nasr City district of Cairo, Egypt, Aug. 14. (Aly Hazzaa/El Shorouk Newspaper, via Associated Press) #

 

A member of the security forces is dragged and stripped of his vest by protesters after his police vehicle was pushed off the 6th of October bridge by protesters, near the largest sit-in by supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi in the eastern Nasr City district of Cairo, Egypt, Aug. 14. (Sabry Khaled/El Shorouk Newspaper, via Associated Press) #

 

Supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi run from Egyptian security forces firing towards them during clashes in Cairo’s Nasr City district, Egypt, Aug. 14. ( Manu Brabo/Associated Press) #

 

Wounded supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi lie on the floor of a makeshift hospital at a sit-in in Cairo, Egypt, Aug. 14.(Manu Brabo/Associated Press) #

 

An injured supporter of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi lies on the ground as Egyptian security forces clear a sit-in camp set up near Cairo University in Cairo’s Giza district, Egypt, Aug. 14. (Hussein Tallal/Associated Press) #

 

Egyptian riot police carry a wounded demonstrator during clashes as security forces try to disperse protest camps on August 14 that were set up in Cairo by supporters of Egypt’s ousted president Mohamed Morsi. (Hassan Mohamed/AFP/Getty Images) #

 

Supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi count bodies in a makeshift morgue after police swept into their encampment with armored vehicles and bulldozers in the Nasr City district of Cairo Aug. 14. (Manu Brabo/Associated Press) #

 

A poster of Egypt’s ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi hangs at a burnt-down hut of his supporters at a sit-in camp after Egyptian security forces clear the sit-in camp near Cairo University in Cairo’s Giza district, Egypt, Aug. 14.(Hussein Tallal/Associated Press)

Egypt: Islamists hit Christian churches

Posted in News with tags on August 22, 2013 by 2eyeswatching

Donate Button 1

Donate Button 2

Post 2381

Egypt: Islamists hit Christian churches

Associated Press

HAMZA HENDAWI 6 hours ago  http://news.yahoo.com/egypt-islamists-hit-christian-churches-235144103.html
The Evangelical Church of Malawi is left in ruins Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013, after it was ransacked, looted and burned on Thursday by an angry mob, in Malawi, south of Minya, Egypt. In the province of Minya south of Cairo, protesters attacked two Christian churches, security officials said. (AP Photo/Roger Anis, El Shorouk Newspaper)

CAIRO (AP) — After torching a Franciscan school, Islamists paraded three nuns on the streets like “prisoners of war” before a Muslim woman offered them refuge. Two other women working at the school were sexually harassed and abused as they fought their way through a mob.

In the four days since security forces cleared two sit-in camps by supporters of Egypt’s ousted president, Islamists have attacked dozens of Coptic churches along with homes and businesses owned by the Christian minority. The campaign of intimidation appears to be a warning to Christians outside Cairo to stand down from political activism.

Christians have long suffered from discrimination and violence in Muslim majority Egypt, where they make up 10 percent of the population of 90 million. Attacks increased after the Islamists rose to power in the wake of the 2011 Arab Spring uprising that drove Hosni Mubarak from power, emboldening extremists. But Christians have come further under fire since President Mohammed Morsi was ousted on July 3, sparking a wave of Islamist anger led by Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood.

Nearly 40 churches have been looted and torched, while 23 others have been attacked and heavily damaged since Wednesday, when chaos erupted after Egypt’s military-backed interim administration moved in to clear two camps packed with protesters calling for Morsi’s reinstatement, killing scores of protesters and sparking deadly clashes nationwide.

One of the world’s oldest Christian communities has generally kept a low-profile, but has become more politically active since Mubarak was ousted and Christians sought to ensure fair treatment in the aftermath.

Rows of display cases are broken and empty at the Malawi Antiquities Museum after it was ransacked and looted between the evening of Thursday, Aug. 15 and the morning of Friday, Aug. 16, 2013 in Malawi, south of Minya, Egypt, Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013. The interim Cabinet authorized police to use deadly force against anyone targeting police and state institutions on Thursday. The violence capped off a week that saw more than 700 people killed across the country. (AP Photo/Roger Anis, El Shorouk Newspaper) EGYPT OUT
Rows of display cases are broken and empty at the Malawi Antiquities Museum after it was ransacked and looted between the evening of Thursday, Aug. 15 and the morning of Friday, Aug. 16, 2013 in Malawi, south of Minya, Egypt, Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013. The interim Cabinet authorized police to use deadly force against anyone targeting police and state institutions on Thursday. The violence capped off a week that saw more than 700 people killed across the country. (AP Photo/Roger Anis, El Shorouk Newspaper) EGYPT OUT

Many Morsi supporters say Christians played a disproportionately large role in the days of mass rallies, with millions demanding that he step down ahead of the coup.

Despite the violence, Egypt’s Coptic Christian church renewed its commitment to the new political order Friday, saying in a statement that it stood by the army and the police in their fight against “the armed violent groups and black terrorism.”

While the Christians of Egypt have endured attacks by extremists, they have drawn closer to moderate Muslims in some places, in a rare show of solidarity.

Hundreds from both communities thronged two monasteries in the province of Bani Suef south of Cairo to thwart what they had expected to be imminent attacks on Saturday, local activist Girgis Waheeb said. Activists reported similar examples elsewhere in regions south of Cairo, but not enough to provide effective protection of churches and monasteries.

Waheeb, other activists and victims of the latest wave of attacks blame the police as much as hard-line Islamists for what happened. The attacks, they said, coincided with assaults on police stations in provinces like Bani Suef and Minya, leaving most police pinned down to defend their stations or reinforcing others rather than rushing to the rescue of Christians under attack.

View gallery.”

Map locates cities where Christians have been targeted; …

Map locates cities where Christians have been targeted; 1c x 4 inches; 46.5 mm x 101 mm;

Another Christian activist, Ezzat Ibrahim of Minya, a province also south of Cairo where Christians make up around 35 percent of the population, said police have melted away from seven of the region’s nine districts, leaving the extremists to act with near impunity.

Two Christians have been killed since Wednesday, including a taxi driver who strayed into a protest by Morsi supporters in Alexandria and another man who was shot to death by Islamists in the southern province of Sohag, according to security officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they weren’t authorized to release the information.

The attacks served as a reminder that Islamists, while on the defensive in Cairo, maintain influence and the ability to stage violence in provincial strongholds with a large minority of Christians.

Gamaa Islamiya, the hard-line Islamist group that wields considerable influence in provinces south of Cairo, denied any link to the attacks. The Muslim Brotherhood, which has led the defiant protest against Morsi’s ouster, has condemned the attacks, spokesman Mourad Ali said.

Sister Manal is the principal of the Franciscan school in Bani Suef. She was having breakfast with two visiting nuns when news broke of the clearance of the two sit-in camps by police, killing hundreds. In an ordeal that lasted about six hours, she, sisters Abeer and Demiana and a handful of school employees saw a mob break into the school through the wall and windows, loot its contents, knock off the cross on the street gate and replace it with a black banner resembling the flag of al-Qaida.

Egyptians walk in the ruins of the Evangelical Church of Malawi after it was ransacked, looted and burned on Thursday by an angry mob, in Malawi, south of Minya, Egypt, Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013. In the province of Minya south of Cairo, protesters attacked two Christian churches, security officials said. Many of Morsi's supporters have criticized Egypt's Christian minority for largely supporting the military's decision to remove him from office, and dozens of churches have been attacked this week. (AP Photo/Roger Anis, El Shorouk Newspaper) EGYPT OUT

An Egyptian walks in the ruins of the Evangelical Church …

Associated Press 

Roger Anis, El Shorouk Newspaper 13 hours ago
An Egyptian walks in the ruins of the Evangelical Church of Malawi Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013, after it was ransacked, looted and burned on Thursday by an angry mob, in Malawi, south of Minya, Egypt. In the province of Minya, protesters attacked two Christian churches, security officials said. (AP Photo/Roger Anis, El Shorouk Newspaper)

By the time the Islamists ordered them out, fire was raging at every corner of the 115-year-old main building and two recent additions. Money saved for a new school was gone, said Manal, and every computer, projector, desk and chair was hauled away. Frantic SOS calls to the police, including senior officers with children at the school, produced promises of quick response but no one came.

The Islamists gave her just enough time to grab some clothes.

In an hourlong telephone interview with The Associated Press, Manal, 47, recounted her ordeal while trapped at the school with others as the fire raged in the ground floor and a battle between police and Islamists went on out on the street. At times she was overwhelmed by the toxic fumes from the fire in the library or the whiffs of tears gas used by the police outside.

Sister Manal recalled being told a week earlier by the policeman father of one pupil that her school was targeted by hard-line Islamists convinced that it was giving an inappropriate education to Muslim children. She paid no attention, comfortable in the belief that a school that had an equal number of Muslim and Christian pupils could not be targeted by Muslim extremists. She was wrong.

The school has a high-profile location. It is across the road from the main railway station and adjacent to a busy bus terminal that in recent weeks attracted a large number of Islamists headed to Cairo to join the larger of two sit-in camps by Morsi’s supporters. The area of the school is also in one of Bani Suef’s main bastions of Islamists from Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood and ultraconservative Salafis.

 Egyptian gather in the ruins of the Evangelical Church of Malawi after it was ransacked, looted and burned on Thursday by an angry mob, in Malawi, south of Minya, Egypt, Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013. In the province of Minya south of Cairo, protesters attacked two Christian churches, security officials said. Many of Morsi's supporters have criticized Egypt's Christian minority for largely supporting the military's decision to remove him from office, and dozens of churches have been attacked this week. (AP Photo/Roger Anis, El Shorouk Newspaper) EGYPT OUTEgyptian gather in the ruins of the Evangelical Church of Malawi after it was ransacked, looted and burned on Thursday by an angry mob, in Malawi, south of Minya, Egypt, Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013. In the province of Minya south of Cairo, protesters attacked two Christian churches, security officials said. Many of Morsi's supporters have criticized Egypt's Christian minority for largely supporting the military's decision to remove him from office, and dozens of churches have been attacked this week. (AP Photo/Roger Anis, El Shorouk Newspaper) EGYPT OUTEgyptian gather in the ruins of the Evangelical Church of Malawi after it was ransacked, looted and burned on Thursday by an angry mob, in Malawi, south of Minya, Egypt, Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013. In the province of Minya south of Cairo, protesters attacked two Christian churches, security officials said. Many of Morsi's supporters have criticized Egypt's Christian minority for largely supporting the military's decision to remove him from office, and dozens of churches have been attacked this week. (AP Photo/Roger Anis, El Shorouk Newspaper) EGYPT OUT
Associated Press 

Roger Anis, El Shorouk Newspaper 13 hours ago
Egyptian gather in the ruins of the Evangelical Church of Malawi after it was ransacked, looted and burned on Thursday by an angry mob, in Malawi, south of Minya, Egypt, Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013. In the province of Minya south of Cairo, protesters attacked two Christian churches, security officials said. Many of Morsi’s supporters have criticized Egypt’s Christian minority for largely supporting the military’s decision to remove him from office, and dozens of churches have been attacked this week. (AP Photo/Roger Anis, El Shorouk Newspaper) EGYPT OUT

“We are nuns. We rely on God and the angels to protect us,” she said. “At the end, they paraded us like prisoners of war and hurled abuse at us as they led us from one alley to another without telling us where they were taking us,” she said. A Muslim woman who once taught at the school spotted Manal and the two other nuns as they walked past her home, attracting a crowd of curious onlookers.

“I remembered her, her name is Saadiyah. She offered to take us in and said she can protect us since her son-in-law was a policeman. We accepted her offer,” she said. Two Christian women employed by the school, siblings Wardah and Bedour, had to fight their way out of the mob, while groped, hit and insulted by the extremists. “I looked at that and it was very nasty,” said Manal.

The incident at the Franciscan school was repeated at Minya where a Catholic school was razed to the ground by an arson attack and a Christian orphanage was also torched.

“I am terrified and unable to focus,” said Boulos Fahmy, the pastor of a Catholic church a short distance away from Manal’s school. “I am expecting an attack on my church any time now,” he said Saturday.

Bishoy Alfons Naguib, a 33-year-old businessman from Minya, has a similarly harrowing story.

Egyptians walk in the ruins of the Evangelical Church of Malawi after it was ransacked, looted and b …

His home supplies store on a main commercial street in the provincial capital, also called Minya, was torched this week and the flames consumed everything inside.

“A neighbor called me and said the store was on fire. When I arrived, three extremists with knifes approached me menacingly when they realized I was the owner,” recounted Naguib. His father and brother pleaded with the men to spare him. Luckily, he said, someone shouted that a Christian boy was filming the proceedings using his cell phone, so the crowd rushed toward the boy shouting “Nusrani, Nusrani,” the Quranic word for Christians which has become a derogatory way of referring to them in today’s Egypt.

Naguib ran up a nearby building where he has an apartment and locked himself in. After waiting there for a while, he left the apartment, ran up to the roof and jumped to the next door building, then exited at a safe distance from the crowd.

“On our Mustafa Fahmy street, the Islamists had earlier painted a red X on Muslim stores and a black X on Christian stores,” he said. “You can be sure that the ones with a red X are intact.”

In Fayoum, an oasis province southwest of Cairo, Islamists looted and torched five churches, according to Bishop Ibram, the local head of the Coptic Orthodox church, by far the largest of Egypt’s Christian denominations. He said he had instructed Christians and clerics alike not to try to resist the mobs of Islamists, fearing any loss of life.

A damaged object lies on the floor of the Malawi Antiquities …

A damaged object lies on the floor of the Malawi Antiquities Museum after it was ransacked and loote …

“The looters were so diligent that they came back to one of the five churches they had ransacked to see if they can get more,” he told the AP. “They were loading our chairs and benches on trucks and when they had no space for more, they destroyed them.”

L.A. Restaurant Charges $20 for Bottle of Water on Pricey New Water Menu

Posted in News with tags on August 15, 2013 by 2eyeswatching

Donate Button 1

Donate Button 2

Post 2370

ABC News Blogs

L.A. Restaurant Charges $20 for Bottle of Water on Pricey New Water Menu

By  | ABC News Blogs – 4 hours ago

http://gma.yahoo.com/blogs/abc-blogs/l-restaurant-charges-20-bottle-water-pricey-water-115851406.html

Ray’s and Stark Bar, a restaurant located inside the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, has introduced an exclusive water menu featuring bottled waters from around the world, all curated by the nation’s first ever water sommelier.

The water menu was introduced last month. It was created by the restaurant’s general manager and water sommelier, Martin Riese, and features 20 sparkling and still brands from 12 different countries.

The menu on the restaurant’s website describes the waters in varying degrees of sweet, salty, smooth and complex, and the brands vary in price.

Iskilde, a still water from Denmark, costs $12 per one-liter bottle. Badoit, a sparkling water from France, costs $8 per .75 liter-bottle. This water was said to pair “well with sweet wine and cheese,” according to the menu.

Beverly Hills 90H20 ( the Los Angeles Time reported that this is Riese’s own brand) sells for $16 per one-liter bottle. It’s described as “pristine spring water from Northern California mountains” that is “combined with a select balance of natural minerals, resulting in a 7.5 pH alkalinity, and a silky smooth, incredibly crisp taste profile.”

At $20 for a .75-liter bottle, Berg, a glacial still water from Greenland, is the most expensive water on the menu.

A .75-liter bottle of Evian costs $8.

Riese is considered an expert on water. In fact, he co-wrote “Die Welt des Wasser (World of Water),” a book on the subject, according to his company profile.

 

L.A. Restaurant Charges $20 for Bottle of Water on Pricey New Water Menu

 

 

 

Britain weighs legal action against Spain on Gibraltar

Posted in News with tags on August 15, 2013 by 2eyeswatching

Donate Button 1

Donate Button 2

Post 2361

Britain weighs legal action against Spain on Gibraltar

Reuters

William James and Peter Griffiths 20 hours ago

By William James and Peter Griffiths

 

Drivers wait in line to enter the British territory of Gibraltar at its border with Spain in front of the Rock of Gibraltarin La Linea de la Concepcion

 

LONDON (Reuters) – Britain warned Spain on Monday it might take legal action to try to force Madrid to abandon tighter controls at the border with the contested British overseas territory of Gibraltar in what it called an “unprecedented” step against a European ally.

The warning coincided with the departure of a British warship for Gibraltar, played down by the British and Spanish governments as part of a long planned, routine exercise but which underscored heightened tensions over the territory.

A spokesman for Prime Minister David Cameron said the Spanish border checks, imposed after Gibraltar created an artificial reef which Spain said blocked its fishing vessels, were “disproportionate” and “politically motivated”.

Tensions over the rocky outpost at the mouth of the Mediterranean to which Spain lays claim have turned into one of the worst rows in years between the two European Union states.

View gallery.”

 

A woman takes a photo as drivers wait in line to enter …

 

A woman takes a photo with her mobile phone as drivers wait in line to enter to Spain at its border  …

“The prime minister is disappointed by the failure of the Spanish to remove the additional border checks this weekend and we are now considering what legal action is open to us,” Cameron’s spokesman said, arguing they breached EU law.

“This would be an unprecedented step,” he added.

Opposition politicians in Spain have accused Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy of using the situation to distract Spaniards from the country’s severe recession and a corruption scandal.

Spain said it would not back down over the border controls which it said were a legal and proportionate step to prevent money laundering and smuggling of tobacco and other products.

If Britain chooses to test whether those restrictions breach EU law on freedom of movement, the case is likely to end up in the European Court of Justice. Judgements there can take years, although special cases can be fast-tracked.

View gallery.”

 

Tourists wait for a bus after visiting the British …

 

Tourists wait for a bus after visiting the British territory of Gibraltar in front of the Rock of Gi …

“There are some conceivable other international fora where you can discuss the issue but in terms of a proper litigation process the only one would be the European Court of Justice,” said Mats Persson, director of the Open Europe think-tank.

SPAIN TO PRESS CLAIM

The territory, which has a population of 30,000 and relies on tourism, the gambling industry and offshore banking, was ceded to Britain by Spain in the 1713 Treaty of Utrecht.

Spain’s tougher checks at the 1.2 km (0.75 mile) border have caused long delays for thousands of tourists and local people. Madrid also aired the idea of imposing a border crossing fee and of banning planes using its airspace to reach Gibraltar.

 

 

A Spanish foreign ministry spokeswoman on Monday restated her country’s position that it was considering through which international forum it could press its claim to Gibraltar.

HMS Westminster, a British Royal Navy warship set sail for the territory on Monday as part of an annual Mediterranean military exercise which both Spain and Britain say has been long planned and is unrelated to the dispute.

It evoked the 16th century naval rivalry between the two countries in which the English repelled an attempt by the Spanish Armada to try to invade England in 1588 and the Spanish defeated an English “Counter Armada” the following year.

A spokesman for the European Commission Jonathan Todd confirmed on Monday that a team of Commission officials would travel to Gibraltar in September to verify compliance with EU rules on frontier controls.

(Additional reporting by Belinda Goldsmith, Fiona Ortiz in Madrid and Charlie Dunmore in Brussels; Editing by Andrew Osborn, Guy Faulconbridge and Philippa Fletcher)

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 69 other followers