Archive for the News Category

Bird Strike Does Disturbing Damage To The Nose Of A 737

Posted in News with tags on May 9, 2015 by 2eyeswatching

Post 4557

George Dvorsky

http://io9.com/bird-strike-does-disturbing-damage-to-the-nose-of-a-737-1703062851

Bird Strike Does Disturbing Damage To The Nose Of A 737

Bird Strike Does Disturbing Damage To The Nose Of A 737

Looking at the caved-in nose of this Boeing 737-800, you’d think it flew into a flying water buffalo. But the damage was caused by a single bird — a potent reminder of what can happen when objects collide at high speed.

The incident occurred earlier this week during Turkish Airlines flight TK2004 from Istanbul to Nevşehir. The bird struck the plane as it was landing, but the pilot managed to land without incident. None of the 125 passengers were injured.

 

As a Turkish Airlines spokesperson told Mashable, this sort of damage is not uncommon:

The nose cone “of a plane is being constructed by soft materials (composit) to minimalize the impact of such hits. Therefore, such standard/normal deformation occurs as a natural result of such incidents,” Dr. Ali Genc, Turkish Airlines senior vice president of media relations, said in an emailed statement.

“The critical bird hits in aviation [are] the ones that occur on the engine area,” Genc said. “Any other area of the aircraft than the engine area, such as [the nose cone], wings, hull and etc. are not [at] risk by bird hit.”

Bird strikes are indeed dangerous when they hit the engine area, as witnessed by the 2009 incident when US Airways Flight 1549 made an emergency landing in the Hudson River off Manhattan.

Female Afghan ‘Top Gun’ soars above gender barrier

Posted in News with tags on May 1, 2015 by 2eyeswatching

Pre History Green Axe Stone

Post 4534

Female Afghan ‘Top Gun’ soars above gender barrier

“Ever since I was a child, when I saw a bird in the sky, I wanted to fly a plane,” Afghanistan’s first female pilot Niloofar Rahmani tells AFP (AFP Photo/Shah Marai)

With a hint of swagger, Afghanistan’s first female pilot since the fall of the Taliban is defying death threats and archaic gender norms to infiltrate what is almost entirely a male preserve.

 Dressed in khaki overalls, aviator shades and a black headscarf, 23-year-old Niloofar Rahmani cuts a striking presence as she struts across the tarmac at the Kabul Air Force base, which is otherwise devoid of women.

“Ever since I was a child, when I saw a bird in the sky, I wanted to fly a plane,” she told AFP at the base, hemmed in by rolling dun-coloured hills.

“Many girls in Afghanistan have dreams… but a number of problems, threats stand in the way.”

Rahmani, who grew up in Kabul, enlisted for an air force training programme in 2010 and kept it secret from her relatives who believe a woman does not belong outside the home.

Two years later she became the first female fixed-wing aviator in Afghanistan’s history and the country’s first woman pilot since the ouster of the Taliban regime.

The once-unimaginable feat recently won her the US State Department’s International Women of Courage Award –- and earned her the sobriquet “Afghan Top Gun” on social media, after the 1986 Tom Cruise film about flying aces in the US Navy.

It is believed there were female Afghan pilots during the pre-Taliban Communist era, but details are scant.

Nearly 14 years since the Taliban government was toppled in a US-led invasion, Afghan women have taken giant strides of progress, with female lawmakers and security personnel now commonplace.

That marks a sea change in women’s rights, as previously women weren’t allowed to leave their homes without a male chaperone and were brutally consigned to the shadows.

But gender parity still remains a distant dream as conservative attitudes prevail.

Rahmani has received threatening calls and letters purportedly from the Taliban, warning her to quit.

The threats grew so menacing in 2013 that she was forced to leave the country for two months.

“They threatened to hurt me and my family,” she said over the roar of military transport planes.

“My only choice was to be strong and ignore them.”

Rahmani always carries a pistol for her protection and though she has grown accustomed to the ogling eyes of men, she never leaves the base in uniform, lest it make her a target.

– ‘I have hope’ –

“Simple things like walking in the streets, going shopping is no longer possible. My freedom has all gone,” she said.

But more than physical threats, it is pervasive conservatism that hurts the most, with Afghanistan stuck in what many deride as a medieval time warp.

Rahmani says she was heartbroken when a mob in Kabul savagely lynched a young woman called Farkhunda last month after an amulet seller, whom she had castigated, falsely accused her of burning the Koran.

“Animals don’t do this to other animals,” she said of the daylight murder which sparked nationwide protests.

“This wasn’t done by the Taliban. These were ordinary people, the young Afghan generation.”

Rahmani also recalled a flight mission when she defied orders from a superior who stopped her from airlifting wounded soldiers in a restive southern province.

Women are traditionally forbidden from transporting the dead or wounded in Afghanistan as “many believe that females have a small heart and are too emotional,” Rahmani said.

Upon completing the task, “I told my commander, ‘punish me if you think I did anything wrong’,” she recalled.

“He smiled and said: ‘you did good’.”

In order to be treated on a par with her male colleagues, Rahmani says she can’t afford to display jangled nerves.

“I have to be tough — so tough, showing no emotion,” she said.

But while Rahmani is pushing at the boundaries of change, she is cautious not to disrespect cultural norms in a country known for its strict gender segregation.

One recent morning, when a male colleague at the base reached out to shake her hand, she declined.

“Why not?” he said, disappointed.

Rahmani smiled politely and later told AFP she didn’t want to send out the wrong signal.

In conservative Afghanistan, even a simple gesture such as a handshake between men and women can sometimes be interpreted as a sign of bad character.

Rahmani is only one of three Afghan women who have trained to become pilots since the 2001 invasion, and one of them has since quit the air force.

When asked how long it would be before the air force has an equal number of men and women pilots, she was forthright.

“Not anytime soon. Maybe 20 or 30 years,” she said.

Woman Finds 3.69-Carat White Diamond at Arkansas State Park, Names It ‘Hallelujah Diamond’

Posted in News with tags , on April 28, 2015 by 2eyeswatching

Post 4526

Woman Finds 3.69-Carat White Diamond at Arkansas State Park, Names It ‘Hallelujah Diamond’

Good Morning America

https://gma.yahoo.com/woman-finds-3-69-carat-white-diamond-arkansas-121328920.html

Susie Clark and her husband spent days hunting diamonds at Crater of Diamonds State Park in Murfreesboro, Arkansas, and on the last day she said a prayer.

“Are you going to bless me and let me find a diamond today?” Clark, from Evening Shade, Arkansas, prayed, according to a park news release.

Her prayer was answered shortly after with a 3.69-carat white diamond, which she saw “sticking out of a furrow ridge in the plowed dirt,” the release said.

Arkansasstateparks.com

Clark has named the teardrop-shaped rock “the Hallelujah Diamond” because it was an answer to her prayer, the release said.

Park Interpreter Waymon Cox described the stone as frosted white with a pearlescent shine.

Oklahoma Teenager Finds 3.85-Carat Canary Diamond

Man Finds 6-Carat Diamond in Park, Doesn’t Plan to Keep It

According to the park, Clark’s find is the largest of this year, though other park-goers have found 121 other diamonds. A visitor found a 6.19-carat white diamond — named the Limitless Diamond — on April 16, 2014. Other diamonds of note found by the park’s visitors include a 16.37-carat white diamond and a 3.85-carat canary diamond.

Arkansasstateparks.com

Clark had first visited the Crater of Diamonds State Park 33 years ago with her mother and grandmother from Germany. ABC News could not reach Clark for comment, but the release said that she plans to keep the diamond.

According to Cox, rainfall in recent weeks, combined with park staffers’ plowing the 37.5-acre search field — eroded the surface of a diamond-bearing deposit, helping to bring more of the stones to the surface and increasing visitors’ chances of finding them.

“Diamonds are a bit heavy for their size, and they lack static electricity, so rainfall slides the dirt off diamonds that are on the surface of the search area, leaving them exposed. And when the sun comes out, they’ll sparkle and be noticed,” he said in the release.

Crater of Diamonds is the world’s only diamond-producing site that is open to the public, according to the park. Visitors who find diamonds are allowed to keep them.

Crazy winds throw window cleaners for a scary swing ride on 91st floor

Posted in News with tags on April 6, 2015 by 2eyeswatching

Post 4443

Casey Chan

http://sploid.gizmodo.com/crazy-winds-throw-window-cleaners-for-a-scary-swing-rid-1695577693/+cherylvis

Crazy winds throw window cleaners for a scary swing ride on 91st floor

Crazy winds throw window cleaners for a scary swing ride on 91st floor

Dear Lord. Cleaning the windows of skyscrapers is already a scary enough job but cleaning windows of the 91st floor of the 1600-foot tall Shanghai World Financial Center while the wind violently throws around the scaffolding like some unhinged, unbuckled roller coaster swing? That is absolutely pants laundering terrifying.

The workers were thankfully rescued but had to ride out the scary ass winds for 15 minutes. I would have passed out in the first 15 seconds. Check out the video:

http://www.liveleak.com/ll_embed?f=1fe36bbd897c

And here’s the building they were cleaning. It’s the 7th tallest building in the world (and a bottle opener for giants):

Crazy winds throw window cleaners for a scary swing ride on 91st floor

Image Credit: Wikipedia

 

Wounded officer commanded respect in Iraq

Posted in News with tags on March 29, 2015 by 2eyeswatching

Post 4404

Wounded officer commanded respect in Iraq

http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2015/03/28/boston-police-officer-wounded-shooting-earned-respect-iraq/u3nyhdSwSOKDhtPxy5BVWO/story.html?s_campaign=email_BG_TodaysHeadline

As a platoon leader in a volatile region of Iraq known as the “Triangle of Death,” Army Ranger Lieutenant John Moynihan used to say there were two ways to be a leader: pull rank and force soldiers to follow, or earn their respect. He knew — and his men knew — which kind he was.

“He lived by that respect,” said Joshua Bartlett, who served under Moynihan as a sergeant and team leader in 2007. Whether Moynihan’s men were taking heavy fire or laying concertina wire, Moynihan was right there in the middle of the action, working shoulder to shoulder. “He respected us, we respected him.”

On Saturday, Moynihan, who left the military and became a Boston police gang unit officer, lay in a medically induced coma at Boston Medical Center, a bullet lodged behind his right ear. Moynihan, who was honored for his bravery in the Watertown shootout with the Boston Marathon bombers in April 2013, had been shot point blank in the face, allegedly by a convicted felon with a history of shooting at police.

“It is clear that Officer Moynihan is a hero for our city, and the entire nation, and today we are thankful for all of those who put their lives on the line every day to protect us,” Mayor Martin J. Walsh said in a statement Saturday.

“He’s a strong kid. Given what great shape he’s in, he’s a fighter. He’s going to pull through,” Police Commissioner William B. Evans said at a press conference Saturday morning.

Moynihan and five other officers were investigating a report of gunshots fired in the area of Humboldt Avenue on Friday night when they stopped a sport utility vehicle with three men inside. When Moynihan walked to the driver’s side, Angelo West, 41, allegedly leapt from the car and began firing a .357 Magnum. Moynihan was struck before he had time to unholster his weapon, according to authorities.

West was shot to death and a woman was wounded in the gun battle that followed.

When you find out that it was an officer that you know, and an officer that helped save your life — it is definitely more significant.’

Richard “Dic” Donohue Jr.  

Quote Icon

Moynihan, 34, who joined the Police Department six years ago as an officer in Dorchester and then moved to the gang unit in 2011, has received eight commissioner’s commendations for his work, according to police Lieutenant Michael McCarthy.

During the Watertown shootout with Boston Marathon bombers Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, Moynihan helped save transit police officer Richard “Dic” Donohue Jr., stanching a gunshot wound. Moynihan was honored for bravery with the department’s Medal of Honor and with the Top Cop Award at the White House last year.

“It was gut-wrenching to hear that, first of all, there was any officer injured in that way in the line of duty,” Donohue said on Saturday. “And when you find out that it was an officer that you know, and an officer that helped save your life — it is definitely more significant.”

Donohue said his family was praying for a full and speedy recovery for Moynihan.

“He’s shown his merit, whether it’s . . . saving my life, or being on patrol and working hard in the Youth Violence Strike Force,” said Donohue. “Those guys are putting their lives on the line every day to make the city a better place.”

Moynihan’s willingness to risk his life to protect others earned him a sterling reputation among his soldiers in Iraq, who nicknamed him “Banana Hands” — a fond reference to his gigantic stature — and who were willing to follow him anywhere because they knew he would fight for them every step of the way, Bartlett said.

Bartlett said the platoon was stationed not on a military base but “in sector” — setting up in homes in Iraqi villages. One day, Bartlett said, fighters hiding behind a palm grove began shooting and firing rocket-propelled grenades at soldiers who were stationed on the rooftop of their building.

Bartlett and his team raced upstairs and Moynihan charged out to the rooftop with him, grabbed a gun, and started directing soldiers where to fire.

“Most lieutenants would have probably been on a radio or in a staircase somewhere, protected,” said Bartlett. “He was right in the middle of it. We had to remind him sometimes that he was a lieutenant.”

When Bartlett left the military and was contemplating becoming a police officer, Moynihan encouraged him, and told him to simply employ the same rules they had followed in Iraq: “When you’re going through the bad stuff, keep your head up. And, I’m always here.”

Bartlett, who is now a police officer in Lubbock, Texas, is one of about 20 of Moynihan’s former soldiers — now spread across the country from Texas to Pennsylvania to Rhode Island — who are planning to fly to Boston to see him.

“Everybody’s praying for him right now,” said Bartlett. “It’s time to pray for him and let him know that his other family’s thinking about him, and we want to be there with him.”

John Moynihan can be seen far left in this photograph taken in Iraq.

HANDOUT

John Moynihan can be seen far left in this photograph taken in Iraq.

Laura Crimaldi of the Globe staff contributed to this report. Evan Allen can be reached at evan.allen@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @evanmallen.

 

Children of war

Posted in News with tags on March 25, 2015 by 2eyeswatching

Post 4384

Children of war

http://www.bostonglobe.com/news/bigpicture/2015/03/13/children-war/7FrhDO4GhmMrBrHqlzPCmO/story.html?p1=BP_Headline

The United Nations children’s agency reported this week that 14 million children in Syria and Iraq are in crisis due to war. The number of children needing aid has greatly increased from the previous year and there are fears that living with the severe violence will permanently scar the young generation. Here is a look at recent photos depicting the lives of children during this conflict.–By Leanne Burden Seidel
Pupils attend the first day of school in the Syrian Kurdish town of Kobane, also known as Ain al-Arab on March 2. They returned to class after Kurdish and rebel forces expelled Islamic State (IS) group jihadists from the town following more than four months of fighting. (Michalis Karagiannis/AFP/Getty Images)
Boys play with a BB gun in the Douma neighborhood of Damascus March 4. (Bassam Khabieh/Reuters)
3
Wounded Syrian children react as they wait for treatment at a clinic in the rebel-held area of Douma, east of the capital Damascus, following reported air strikes by regime forces on March 13. More than 210,000 people have been killed in Syria since the uprising began in March 2011. (Abd Douamany/AFP/Getty Images)
4
Syrian refugee children attend class in a UNICEF school at the Al Zaatari refugee camp in the Jordanian city of Mafraq, near the border with Syria March 11. Nearly four million people have fled Syria since 2011, when anti-government protests turned into a violent civil war. Jordan says it is sheltering around 1.3 million refugees. (Muhammad Hamed/Reuters)
5
A Kurdish fighter walks with his child in the center of the Syrian border town of Kobane, known as Ain al-Arab, on January 28. (BULENT KILIC/AFP/Getty Images)
6
A displaced Iraqi Sunni girl who fled with many others the villages of of Albu Ajil and Al-Dor due to fighting between Islamic State (IS) group militants and government forces surrounding the northern Iraqi city of Tikrit, cries after arriving at an army camp in the city of Samarra to take refuge on March 8. (AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images)
7
Syrian children walk through the debris in the rebel-held area of Douma, east of the capital Damascus, following reported air strikes by regime forces on March 13. (Abd Douamany/AFP/Getty Images)
8
Mourners chant slogans against the Islamic State group during the funeral procession of three members of a Shiite group, Asaib Ahl al-Haq, or League of the Righteous, who were killed in Tikrit while fighting Islamic militants, in Najaf, 100 miles (160 kilometers) south of Baghdad, Iraq, , March 11. (Jaber al-Helo/Associated Press)
9
An injured child sits on a bed in a field hospital after what activists said were air strikes by forces loyal to Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad in Douma eastern Al-Ghouta, near Damascus Jan. 25. (Badra Mamet/Reuters)
10
Syrian children reenact scenes, they said to have seen in Islamic State videos, in the rebel-held Damascus suburb of Douma, on March 5. (Abd Doumany/AFP/Getty Images)
11
Syrian girls, carrying school bags provided by UNICEF, walk past the rubble of destroyed buildings on their way home from school on March 7 in al-Shaar neighborhood, in the rebel-held side of the northern Syrian city of Aleppo. (IZEIN AL-RIFAI/AFP/Getty Images)
12
Turkish actress Tuba Buyukustun (3rd R), goodwill ambassador for UNICEF, speaks with Syrian refugee children as she visits a UNICEF centre at the Zaatari refugee camp, in the Jordanian city of Mafraq, near the border with Syria March 4. The Zaatari camp houses at least 70,000 Syrian refugees. (Muhammad Hamed /Reuters)
13
A woman and her child sit in a military vehicle as she returns home at the town of Tal Ksaiba, near the town of al-Alam, Iraq, March 7. (Thaier Al-Sudani/Reuters)
14
Pupils run through a damaged wall for the first day of school in the Syrian Kurdish town of Kobane, also known as Ain al-Arab, as they returned to class after Kurdish and rebel forces expelled Islamic State (IS) group jihadists from the town following more than four months of fighting. (Michalis Karagiannis/AFP/Getty Images)
15
Syrian refugee children stand in the corridor at the Al-Rama Public School that is home to 22 Syrian families in Wadi Khaled in the Lebanese-Syrian border village of Al-Rama, north Lebanon. (Hussein Malla/Associated Press)
16
Displaced Syrian children gather in a classroom in a school that has been turned into a temporary shelter in the Qudsaya neighborhood on the outskirts of Damascus, Syria, Feb. 23. (Associated Press)
17
A Syrian child receives a vaccination against polio during a campaign organized by the Syrian Arab Red Crescent (SARC) in the rebel-held area of Eastern Ghouta, on the outskirts of the capital Damascus, on Feb. 22. (ABD DOUMANY/AFP/Getty Images)
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A Syrian refugee child clears snow on a snowy day in Istanbul, Turkey, Feb. 19. (ULAS YUNUS TOSUN/EPA)
19
A Syrian child sits in the back of a truck loaded with furniture as residents collect what’s left of their belongings from their apartments on Feb. 13, following months of shelling by regime forces in the besieged rebel held area of Douma, north east of the capital Damascus. (SAMEER AL-DOUMY/AFP/Getty Images)
20
Yazidi refugees in their accomodation in a refugee camp in Erbil, Iraq, Feb. 20. The Yazidi religious community fled parts of Iraq currently controlled by the Islamic State militants (IS). (ROBERT JAEGER/EPA)
21
A Syrian man carries a wounded child at a makeshift clinic following reported air strikes by forces loyal to President Bashar al-Assad in the rebel held area of Douma on Feb. 5. Syrian rebels fired dozens of mortar rounds at Damascus, killing at least five people, with government forces responding with air strikes that killed eight people. (ABD DOUMANY/AFP/Getty Images)
22
Syrian refugee children who fled violence in Syrian city of Ain al-Arab, known also as Kobani, collect water in a camp in the border town of Suruc, Turkey, Feb. 1. (Emrah Gurel/Associated Press)
23
Syrian children play on Feb. 1 at the Rojava refugee camp in Sanliurfa. (BULENT KILIC/AFP/Getty Images)
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An injured child reacts in a field hospital after what activists said were air strikes by forces loyal to Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad in Douma eastern Al-Ghouta, near Damascus Jan. 25. (Badra Mame/Reuters)
25
Kurdish childrens stand in the center of the Syrian town of Kobane, also known as Ain al-Arab on Jan. 28. (BULENT KILIC/AFP/Getty Images)
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A boy carries bread as he makes his way through rubble of damaged buildings in the Douma neighborhood of Damascus, March 4. (Bassam Khabieh/Reuters)
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An injured Syrian child waits for treatment at a makeshift hospital in the rebel held area of Douma, north east of the capital Damascus, following reported air strikes by forces loyal to President Bashar al-Assad on Feb. 2. (ABD DOUMANY/AFP/Getty Images)

Heroic Dog Buries Her Puppies And Saves Them From Devastating Forest Fire

Posted in News with tags on March 21, 2015 by 2eyeswatching

Post 4369

Heroic Dog Buries Her Puppies And Saves Them From Devastating Forest Fire

Read more at http://www.reshareworthy.com/dog-saves-puppies-from-forest-fire/#RSuqmx6tJ7uCBi2u.99

A mother dog desperate to save her newborn puppies from a forest fire raging through Valparaiso, Chile, buried her puppies in a deep hole to protect them from the flames and smoke. She then ran away and found shelter for herself. Miraculously, all 10 dogs were found alive and in good condition.

image: http://www.reshareworthy.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/puppies-forest-fire-4.jpg

puppies-forest-fire-4

 

It was a rare piece of good news for people in the area. The huge fire, which started on Friday, March 2015 has burned for days. One person was killed and thousands were evacuated as the fire spread. The fire is believed to have started at an illegal landfill site.

image: http://www.reshareworthy.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/puppies-forest-fire-2.jpg

puppies-forest-fire-2

 

Firefighters were putting out tires that had caught on fire, when someone told them that they had seen the dog dig a hole under the tires. They investigated and found 9 puppies around 2-weeks-old and after 45 minutes had freed and rescued all of them. They went on to rescue the mom who was hiding under a container.

image: http://www.reshareworthy.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/puppies-forest-fire-1.jpg

puppies-forest-fire-1

 

The puppies were reunited with their mother, who has been named “La Negrita” and the homeless family is now being looked after by volunteers. Many residents in the area have already expressed interest in adopting the dogs.

Below is a longer video of the dramatic rescue. Note the video is in Spanish.

Share this amazing rescue story with your animal-loving friends and family!
Read more at http://www.reshareworthy.com/dog-saves-puppies-from-forest-fire/#RSuqmx6tJ7uCBi2u.99

 

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